2013-2014 Season Calendar

September October November December January February March April May

20-concert series: Mondays at 2pm and 7:30pm 
All performances, except where noted, are held at
 Good Shepherd Presbyterian Church
152 West 66th Street, New York, NY 10023
Find out more about the Jupiter Players and our Guest Artists.

Tickets  $25, $17, $10  Call 212.799.1259
or e-mail admin@jupitersymphony.com
Printable Calendar &Ticket Order Form (pdf)

 
September
September 9  Style & Splendor
Mark Kaplan violin
Lisa Shihoten violin
Dimitri Murrath viola
Mihai Marica cello
Nathaniel West double bass
Alexander Kobrin piano
Vadim Lando clarinet
Karl Kramer horn
Gina Cuffari bassoon

Carl STAMITZ  Quartet in Eb Major Op. 8 No. 2 • published 1773
  • Papa Mozart called Carl and his brother Anton “2 wretched scribblers, gamblers, swillers and adulterers,” but a contemporary music lexicographer, Ernst Ludwig Gerber, rebuts Leopold’s characterization, noting that “it is a great undertaking to live in Germany as a free artist, and he who tries and wishes to succeed must not have any less art than Stamitz...in his relationships, as highly esteemed for his honorable and noble character, as for his art” ~ for violin, clarinet, horn and bassoon

SCHUMANN  Abendlied “Evening Song” Op. 107 • 1851-1852
  • of gossamer beauty—originally for voice and piano, Ferruccio BUSONI (the Italian composer and pianist) made a transcription, in 1881, of this tender portrait of a dark night for clarinet and string quartet

Louis SPOHR  Duo in A minor Op. 67 No. 1 • 1824
  • one of 3 Opus 67 duets sometimes referred to as Grand Duo Concertantes, and often regarded as the best ever written for 2 violins because of their exploitation of the full range of the instrument and mastery in giving both parts a play, together, in almost symphonic proportions and complexity ~ Spohr was the pioneer of conducting with a baton and a forerunner of early Romanticism

Richard STRAUSS  Till Eulenspiegel’s Merry Pranks Op. 28 • 1895
  • chronicles the misadventures and pranks of the German peasant folk hero, Till Eulenspiegel, “in the old-style roguish manner” ~ this clever deconstruction of the orchestral tone poem by Franz HASENÖHRL for violin, clarinet, horn, bassoon and double bass is his jovial travesty entitled Till Eulenspiegel—einmal anders “another way”

The horn and clarinet play two themes representing Till: the horn’s lilting theme reaches a peak, falls downward, and ends in three long, loud notes, each progressively lower; the clarinet’s crafty and wheedling theme suggests a trickster at his trickiest.

SCHUBERT  Piano Quintet in Bb Major “The Trout” Op. 114 • 1819
  • probably the most famous of all piano quintets ~ written at age 22 in less than a week for Sylvester Paumgartner, a rich Austrian patron and amateur cellist, who had asked Schubert for a quintet that would include a movement based on a favorite song, Die Forelle “The Trout”

September 23  Czech this Out!
Roman Rabinovich piano
Xiao-Dong Wang
violin
Maurycy Banaszek viola
Mihai Marica
cello
Barry Crawford flute
Vadim Lando
clarinet
Gina Cuffari
bassoon & soprano

Josef SUK  “With Nosegay in Hand” • 1917
  • as pretty as a posy ~ Dvorák’s pupil and son-in-law penned this Bagatelle for flute, violin and piano for his fifteen-year-old son and his two friends

Adalbert GYROWETZ  Flute Quartet in D Major Op. 11 No. 1 • 1795
  • wonderfully Haydnesque ~ friends of the celebrated Bohemian included Mozart, who performed one of his symphonies at the Mehlgrube in Vienna; Goethe in Rome; Haydn (in London), to whom Gyrowetz was devoted; Beethoven, at whose funeral he was a pallbearer; and Schubert, also a pallbearer for Beethoven

Julius FUCÍK  Die Gardinenpredigt “The Harangue” Op. 268 • circa 1914
  • Dvorák’s composition pupil captures the argumental character of a wigging or telling off in this Burlesque for clarinet, bassoon and piano ~ Fucík—composer, bassoonist and bandmaster—was conductor of the 92nd Infantry Regiment at Theresienstadt (now Terezín), and his concerts in Prague and Berlin drew audiences that numbered in the thousands ~ his most recognizable work, the “Entrance of the Gladiators,” aka “Thunder and Blazes,” is one of today’s best known circus marches

Bedrich SMETANA  Die Moldau • 1874
  • evokes the sounds of Bohemia’s great river, Vltava (Moldau, in German) ~ from his cycle of 6 nationalistic symphonic poems, Má vlast “My Country,” arranged by the Swiss composer and pianist, Boris MERSSON, for piano trio

In Smetana’s own words, “The composition describes the course of the Vltava, starting from the two small springs, the Cold and Warm Vltava, to the joining of both streams into a single current, the course of the Vltava through woods and meadows, through landscapes where a farmer’s wedding is celebrated, the round dance of the mermaids in the night’s moonshine, and on the nearby rocks where proud castles, palaces and ruins loom aloft. The Vltava swirls into the St John’s Rapids; then it widens and flows toward Prague, past the Vyšehrad, and then majestically vanishes into the distance, ending at the Labe (Elbe, in German).” ~ Má Vlast was influenced by the 1873 tone poem of Zdenek Fibich, Zaboj, Slavoj, a Ludek (see October 14).

Johann Wenzel KALLIWODA Die Abendglocken “The Evening Bells” Op. 91 No. 1
  • a lovely song for soprano, cello and piano

Antonín DVORÁK  Piano Trio No. 1 in Bb Major Op. 21 • 1875
  • undeservedly neglected, the Idol of Prague’s small treasure reveals an emerging voice, brimming with energy and ideas—fresh, natural and original—distinct from Wagnerian influences ~ written at age 34

 
 
 
October
October 7  Contrasts

Stefan Milenkovich violin
Lisa Shihoten
violin
Stefani Collins
violin
Emily Daggett Smith
violin
Barry Crawford
flute

Cynthia Phelps viola
Maxim Lando
piano
Vicki Powell viola

Mihai Marica cello
Bronwyn Banerdt
cello

Alexander GLAZUNOV Elegie Op. 105
  • string quartet in memory of his patron Mitrofan P. Belyayev, Russian music publisher and timber merchant ~ Upon hearing Glazunov’s 1st Symphony in 1882 (written at age 16) Belyayev offered to finance the publication of his works.

Arthur Vincent LOURIÉ  La flûte à travers le violon • 1935
  • various interesting dialogs between the flute and violin, expressed in the neoclassical idiom ~ by the Russian composer, born Naum Izrailevich Luria, and written while living in exile in Paris before moving to the United States in 1941 ~ he is among the forgotten 20th century composers whose works have been performed by Gidon Kremer

Alexander BORODIN  Piano Quintet in C minor • 1862
  • this lovely quintet with lyrical and melancholy themes, Russian folk elements, and hints of Schumann and Glinka heralds the maturity of the chemist and self-taught composer

Harold Schonberg, in The Lives of the Great Composers, describes the circumstances of Borodin’s last work before he joined the nationalistic Balakirev circle: “After his return from Heidelberg in 1862—he came back to St Petersburg with a wife, a Russian pianist he had met in Germany—he was appointed to the faculty of chemistry in the Academy of Medicine. He moved into an apartment on the grounds. There he lived for the rest of his life with his wife, innumerable cats, and equally innumerable relatives, in a state of happy and maniacal disorder. He was an easy-going, kind-hearted man. Professor Borodin, one of the most respected chemists in Europe, was loved by his pupils. How he found time to compose anything remains a mystery. Students, friends, scientists, musicians, and in-laws were constantly wandering through the rooms of the Borodin apartment. The samovar was at a perpetual boil. Borodin never had any privacy. Often he found a relative or visitor in his own bed, and with a resigned shrug he would camp on the sofa for the night. He described himself as a Sunday composer. ‘Science is my work and music is my fun.’’

Arvo PÄRT  Fratres “Brethren” for string quartet • 1985
  • gentle and mystical, the medieval-like sound is captured through tintinnabulation (little bells), which the Estonian composer explained as follows: “I have discovered that it is enough when a single note is beautifully played. This one note, or a moment of silence, comforts me. I work with very few elements—with one voice, with two voices. I build with the most primitive materials—with the triad, with one specific tonality. The three notes of a triad are like bells. And that is why I call it tintinnabulation.”

Reinhold GLIÈRE  String Octet in D Major Op. 5 • 1900
  • “It is shot through and through with magnificent melody” said Wilhelm Altmann of this expressive Romantic work ~ the review of its premiere in the Russian Musical Gazette published on 11 January 1901, added, “The Octet attracted much public attention and proved a great success. One of the foremost merits of the Octet is its exalted mood, suffusing nearly every bar. Glière’s music flows smoothly, lightly and naturally, while at the same time shining with elegant themes and betraying accomplished mastery of the string instruments” ~ Glière’s teachers included Taneyev, Arensky and Ippolitov-Ivanov, and among his students were Khachaturian, Myaskovsky, the eleven-year-old Prokofiev and Scriabin’s young son.

October 14  Austrian Ties
Michael Brown piano
Misha Keylin
violin
Emily Daggett Smith violin
Austin Huntington
cello
Barry Crawford flute
Vadim Lando
clarinet
Karl Kramer
horn

SCHUBERT  Piano Trio in Bb Major “Sonatensatz” D. 28 • 1812
  • a charming sonata movement with lovely tunes, written at age 15 during a burst of creativity, harks of Haydn and showing the influence of Salieri, who was his teacher in counterpoint at the time ~ the middle section, with the violin singing birdlike over the piano is especially lovely

MOZART  Symphony No. 36 in C Major “Linz” K. 425 • 1783
  • created “at breakneck speed”—conceived, written down, copied, rehearsed and conducted during a stopover in Linz—all within 4 days ~ admirably arranged for piano, flute, violin and cello by his pupil and friend, Johann Nepomuk Hummel

Ignaz LACHNER  Die gute alte Zeit “The Good Old Days” Op. 77 • 1874
  • a winning, early Romantic string trio by the second of three talented brothers, who in his younger days was organist of the Lutheran Church in Vienna; he also held various positions as assistant Kapellmeister in the Vienna Court Opera

Zdenek FIBICH  Quintet in D Major Op. 42 • 1893
  • born to a Czech father and Viennese mother, Fibich had a bicultural upbringing and became as famous as his Bohemian contemporaries, Smetana and Dvorák ~ Edith Eisler, the late music critic, described his bewitching Quintet for violin, clarinet, horn, cello and piano as “steeped in the Romantic German tradition” with a slow movement for its centerpiece—“a truly beautiful, long-breathing melody, stated first by the piano in solid and arpeggiated chords, then repeated with a florid violin obbligato. The work’s most pervasive characteristics are its democratic distribution of the solos, its unabashed romanticism, and its surging, soaring melodies; but the heart-on-sleeve quality of the music is so genuine that sentiment never lapses into sentimentality.” ~ In 1881 Fibich began an affair with one of his students, the singer Anezka Schulzová, and the deep passion that developed fueled his compositions. When it became apparent to his wife that she was not the woman who inspired the Quintet, she reportedly stormed off upon hearing it.

October 28  Diverse Trios
William Wolfram piano
Vadim Gluzman
violin
Suren Bagratuni
cello
Maurycy Banaszek viola
Barry Crawford
flute
Vadim Lando
clarinet

Paul WRANITZKY  Flute Trio in B Major • date not known
  • in brilliant style ~ one of the most highly respected musicians in Europe in his day, the Moravian composer’s circle of friends included Mozart, Haydn and Beethoven ~ he played a prominent part in the musical life of Vienna and was the conductor of first choice—Haydn insisted that he direct the Viennese performances of The Creation and Beethoven asked him to conduct the premiere of his First Symphony on 2 April 1800

MOZART  “Kegelstatt” Trio K. 498 • 1786
  • no skittles here, as its nickname suggests, but a work of intimate friendship and love for clarinet, viola and piano written for his pupil, Franziska von Jacquin; Mozart most likely played the viola and Anton Stadler the clarinet

TCHAIKOVSKY  Piano Trio in A minor Op. 50 • 1882
  • passionate lyricism prevails in this magnum opus, composed in remembrance of his mentor and close friend, Nikolai Rubinstein, younger brother of Anton ~ the massive trio was first performed at the Moscow Conservatory (founded by the Rubinstein brothers) in March 1882, with Sergey Taneyev at the piano ~ in a letter to his patroness Nadejda von Meck on 20 January 1882, he wrote saying, “I fear I may have arranged music of a symphonic character as a trio”

 
 
 
November
November 11  An Italian Feast

Roman Rabinovich piano
Itamar Zorman violin
Cynthia Phelps viola
Lisa Shihoten violin
David Requiro
cello

Barry Crawford flute
Rita Mitsel
oboe
Vadim Lando
clarinet
Karl Kramer
horn
Gina Cuffari
bassoon

Ottorino RESPIGHI  Quintetto in G minor P. 21 • date not known
  • leisurely paced, the graceful Neoclassical piece for wind quintet reveals the composer’s interest in music of the 18th century and earlier

Giacomo PUCCINI String Quartet in D Major • 1880-1883
  • the verismo opera composer’s charming work written during his years at the Conservatory in Milan

Amilcare PONCHIELLI  Ricordanze della Traviata “Memories of La Traviata” • [1873]
  • Puccini’s teacher draws on melodies of Verdi’s middle-period opera, La Traviata—the brindisi (drinking song) “Amami Alfredo,” the first act love duet, “Ah fors’è lui,” and “Gran Dio, morir si giovine!” from Act IV ~ both lyrical and virtuoso capabilities of the flute, oboe, clarinet and piano are brandished in this marvelous divertimento ~ Ponchielli is best known for his ballet “Dance of the Hours” from the opera La Gioconda, recognizable as the “Hippo Dance” in Walt Disney’s Fantasia

Vittorio GIANNINI  Piano Quintet • 1932
  • lush, passionate, and irrepressibly Romantic ~ by the Italian-American composer from a distinguished musical family

November 25  Sheer Beauty

Max Levinson piano
Dmitri Berlinsky
violin
Paul Neubauer viola

Robert Cohen cello
James Austin Smith oboe
Vadim Lando
clarinet

MOZART  Clarinet Quartet No. 2 in Eb Major • after 1781
  • arranged from the Violin Sonata K. 380/374f, possibly by Johann André, the publisher who acquired Mozart’s manuscripts from his widow Constanze

August KLUGHARDT  Schilflieder “Song of the Reeds” Op. 28 • 1872
  • 5 splendid fantasy pieces for oboe, viola and piano after the poems of Nikolaus Lenau, depicting a day and evening spent wandering in the woods and by a pond—various moods are evoked from dreamy to agitated (as clouds gather and heavy rains fall), contemplative (“I walk to the lonely bank of reeds and think of you”), then turbulent, and ending calmly with the passing of the summer storm ~ under the spell of Liszt for a time, the German composer was also influenced by Schumann and Wagner

Antonín DVORÁK  Piano Quartet No. 1 in D Major Op. 23 • 1875
  • a masterpiece of Slavic lyricism and Bohemian harmony

 
 
 
December
December 9  Spätzle & Goulash
Adam Neiman piano
Vadim Lando clarinet
Karl Kramer
horn
Gina Cuffari
bassoon
Stefan Jackiw violin
Lisa Shihoten violin
Vicki Powell
viola
David Requiro cello
 
Note: Jennifer Frautschi
replaces Stefan Jackiw for this concert

Michael HAYDN  Divertimento in Eb Major P. 111 • 1790
  • by Joseph’s younger brother, who was held in high regard in Salzburg ~ for violin, viola, clarinet, horn and bassoon

Zoltán KODÁLY  Serenade Op. 12 • 1920
  • Bartók said of his countryman, “If I were to name the composer whose works are the most perfect embodiment of the Hungarian spirit, I would answer Kodály.” His thoughts on the Serenade for 2 violins and viola appeared in a review in 1921: “Despite unusual chord combinations and surprising originality [the Serenade] is still firmly based on tonality.... The means used by the composer, the choice of instruments and the superb richness of instrumental effects achieved despite the economy of the work merit great attention in themselves. The content is suited to the form. It reveals a personality with something entirely new to say and one who is capable of communicating this in a masterful and concentrated fashion.”

Béla BARTÓK  Piano Quintet • 1903-1904
  • a big early work, the dramatic Romantic quintet is shot with a dash of Brahms and Strauss, and a distinct Hungarian flavor ~ Bartók performed its premiere with the Frill Quartet in Vienna

December 16  Balancing Acts

Mikhail Kopelman violin
Elizaveta Kopelman piano
Milena Pajaro-van de Stadt viola

David Requiro cello
Bronwyn Banerdt
cello
Vadim Lando
clarinet

Both Edouard DESTENAY and César CUI had dual careers—as composers and military men. Destenay served in the French Army and was an Officier of the French Legion of Honor; Cui was an army officer, expert in fortifications, and teacher at 3 military academies in St Petersburg, attaining the rank of general in 1906. Although Saint-Saëns had only one vocation, he was a multifaceted intellectual and was knowledgeable in many areas outside of music: he was a whiz at mathematics, and was keenly interested in geology, archaeology, botany, lepidoptery, astronomy, acoustics, and ancient musical instruments. Arensky, likewise, did not have a second career, but when not engaged in useful musical endeavors, he spent lots of time drinking and gambling!

Edouard DESTENAY  Trio in B minor Op. 27 • 1906
  • written in the language of Saint-Saëns and the German Romantics during his retirement from the army between 1903 and 1914, when he returned to France, for the unusual combination of oboe, clarinet and piano ~ born in Algiers, Destenay was a winner of the Prix de Rome, and Committee Member of the Society of French Musicians

Camille SAINT-SAËNS  Piano Trio No. 1 in F Major Op. 18 • 1864
  • unfettered in spirit, the Trio propels with exhilaration and optimism throughout, interrupted only by a dreamily sorrowful slow movement that includes folk themes from the Auvergne, where he had recently been on holiday ~ Berlioz and Liszt were close friends deeply impressed by his work, and when Maurice Ravel wrote his own piano trio in 1915, he expressed admiration for the beauty of form and balance of this Trio

César CUI  Orientale Op. 50 No. 9 • 1894
  • the Russian composer of French and Lithuanian descent captures the mood to a T in this exotic miniature from Kaleidoscope, his album of pieces for violin and piano

Anton ARENSKY  String Quartet No. 2 in A minor Op. 35 • 1894
  • shortly after the death of Tchaikovsky, his disciple wrote this wondrous elegy as a memorial, scored less commonly for violin, viola and two cellos to create a dark, somber timbre ~ the quartet opens with a muted psalm theme from ancient Russian church music, followed by a set of variations on a song by Tchaikovsky—“The Crown of Roses” from Sixteen Children’s Songs—and ends with a Finale that includes a fugue based on a medieval Russian anthem, Slava Bogu na nebe, Slava “Glory to the Sun”

 
 
 
January
 January 6  Tinker Tailor : the Art of Transcription
Alon Goldstein piano
Itamar Zorman violin
Cynthia Phelps viola
David Requiro cello
Barry Crawford
flute
Rita Mitsel oboe
Vadim Lando
clarinet
Karl Kramer
horn
Gina Cuffari
bassoon
 
Note: Robin Scott
replaces Itamar Zorman for this concert

Emanuel Aloys FÖRSTER  String Quintet in C minor Op. 19 • 1801
  • elegance personified ~ by the Austrian composer who was friends with Haydn and Mozart, and who was so highly esteemed by Beethoven (22 years his junior) that on one occasion he called Förster the “old Master” ~ transcribed for wind quintet by the late Verne REYNOLDS, respected American hornist, composer and teacher

MOZART Piano Quintet in Eb Major K. 452 • 1784
  • he performed this glorious piece himself on April Fool’s Day, and in a letter to his father declared it “the best thing I have so far written in my life” ~ transcribed for piano and string trio from the original quintet for piano and 4 winds by his friend and assistant, Franz Jakob Freystädtler, who took part in the completion of the Requiem, among many other tasks

BRAHMS  Trio in A minor Op. 114 • 1891
  • his friend Eusebius Mandyczewski, a respected music scholar, upon hearing the Trio, remarked, “It is as though the instruments were in love with each other” ~ pianist Alon Goldstein says, “it is a MOST beautiful Brahms” ~ for piano, viola (transcribed from the original clarinet part by Brahms himself) and cello

 January 20  Cold Comfort
Gilles Vonsattel piano
Lisa Shihoten violin
Maurycy Banaszek
viola
David Requiro
cello
Misha Vitenson violin
Barry Crawford flute
Vadim Lando
clarinet
Karl Kramer
horn

Edvard GRIEG  Andante con moto • 1878
  • his Dutch colleague and close friend of many years, Julius Röntgen, discovered the manuscript posthumously; elated, he expressed his reaction to Grieg’s widow, Nina: “It is a beautiful piece and completely in order.... What solemnity it conveys! How he can’t get enough of that single theme, that even in the major mode retains its mourning character, and then develops so beautifully its full power.... The piece can very well stand by itself and does not at all give the impression of being a fragment, as it constitutes a perfect entity in itself.”

Jean SIBELIUS  En Saga Septet • 1892
  • a dark, fantastical tone poem ~ in an arrangement by Gregory M. Barrett for string quartet, double bass, flute and clarinet, with an added horn part by Karl Kramer

Fred Kirshnit, in a New York Sun review of Jupiter’s previous performance of this sublime work, commented, “I have loved En Saga in its massive orchestral form since childhood, but I am an instant convert to the chamber version as a result of this performance. There is considerable evidence that Sibelius originally envisioned En Saga for some combination of small groups of winds and strings. When this composition was complete, however, it was already fully fleshed out for orchestra. This chamber version is superior primarily because of timbral combinations. Colors are more vivid in solo wind parts, while the landscape is incredibly stark. In fact, the spare instrumentation magnifies exponentially Sibelius’s signature atavistic feel. This was fantasy writing at its most affecting. Every sonic combination was a new shock. This was the best performance of any work I have encountered thus far this season.”

Christian SINDING  Piano Quintet Op. 5 • 1882-1884
  • fresh, vigorous and dynamic, the immense Romantic work brought the Norse composer lavish praise from Tchaikovsky, Busoni and Sibelius as well as international fame in his day ~ after its premiere, the prestigious Musikalisches Wochenblatt of Leipzig reported that it “demonstrates in all four of its movements a simply astounding talent for invention and combination as well as a wonderful sense of sound effect. At the same time, the ideas are so masterfully executed and such a splendid contrast of themes is in evidence throughout, that one cannot cease to voice one’s admiration for this very important work which both is daring and individual” ~ the Quintet created an immediate sensation, not only because it violated many established rules of composition (such as the use of parallel fifths) but also by virtue of its great originality and abundance of musical ideas

 
 
 
February
February 3  Admirers
Drew Petersen piano
Mayuko Kamio
violin
Maurycy Banaszek viola
Inbal Segev cello
Barry Crawford
flute

Friedrich HERMANN  Mazurka Op. 1 • [1855]
  • a little folk dance for viola and piano by the German composer, prolific arranger and editor, well known for his work on compositions by major composers such as Haydn, Mozart, BEETHOVEN, and SCHUBERT as well as those by famous violinists, including Kreutzer and Bériot, published by the Peters Edition

Hermann, a graduate of the Leipzig Conservatory, where he studied composition with Mendelssohn and Niels Gade and violin with Ferdinand David, became principal violist of the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra, Professor of Violin at the Conservatory, and a member of the Gewandhaus Quartet ~ a contemporary noted that in 1852 his Symphony was performed “with great success” at the Gewandhaus concerts.

BEETHOVEN  Serenade in D Major Op. 25 • 1801
  • at the onset of his deafness, Beethoven penned this thoroughly charming, cheerful frolic for flute, violin and viola

SCHUBERT  String Quintet in C Major D. 956 • 1828
  • his sublime tour de force of heavenly length encompasses a range of emotions through its beauty, power and intensity ~ composed two months before his death ~ transcribed for piano trio by Friedrich HERMANN possibly around 1853, when the full score was first published by Diabelli

Schubert held Beethoven in high esteem; the respect was mutual. While on his deathbed in 1827, Beethoven, upon seeing several of Schubert’s songs, exclaimed, “Truly in Schubert there is the divine spark.” During these dark days, on one of his visits to Beethoven, accompanied by Anselm Hüttenbrenner, the dying man remarked, “You, Anselm, have my mind, but Franz has my soul.” Schubert was a torchbearer at Beethoven’s funeral.

February 17 “God” & the Russians
Ilya Itin piano
Mikhail Kopelman
violin
Lisa Shihoten violin
Paul Neubauer viola
Ani Aznavoorian cello
Vadim Lando
clarinet

MOZART  Duo No. 2 in Bb Major for violin and viola K. 424 • 1783
  • written for his friend, Michael Haydn, who could not fulfill a commission because of illness ~ from the period of his 10 great quartets

Paul JUON  4 Trio-Miniaturen Opp. 18 and 24 • 1901 and 1904
  • sadly sweet and perky suite for clarinet, cello and piano—Rêverie, Humoreske and Elegie from Satyre und Nymphen and Danse phantastique from Tanzrhythmen, originally for piano ~ born in Moscow of Swiss parents, Juon was nicknamed “The Russian Brahms” by no one less than Rachmaninoff!

Sergei PROKOFIEV  5 Melodies Op. 35bis • 1925
  • haunting, bittersweet, appealing wordless songs, full of accidentals and twisting melodic lines ~ originally composed in California for voice and piano and premiered in New York City in 1921; he then reworked them into lyric miniatures for violin and piano

Dmitri SHOSTAKOVICH  Piano Quintet in G minor Op. 57 • 1940
  • rigorous and thought-provoking, his magnificent quintet is considered by some to be his greatest work ~ it won the Stalin Prize of 100,000 rubles, the highest monetary award for chamber music at the time

 
 
 
March
March 3  Polish Brilliance

Alexander Kobrin piano
Areta Zhulla
violin
Lisa Shihoten violin

Milena Pajaro-van de Stadt viola

David Requiro cello
Nicholas Cathcart double bass
Barry Crawford
flute

Salomon JADASSOHN  Serenade No. 2 in D Major • 1879
  • born in Breslau (the historic capital of Silesia in western Poland), the Jewish composer studied with Liszt and Moscheles ~ a gifted melodist in the tradition of Mendelssohn, his work is also influenced by Liszt and Wagner, as revealed in the Serenade for flute, string quartet and double bass

Ignacy Jan PADEREWSKI  Menuet célèbre Op. 14 No. 1 • 1887
  • the renowned pianist’s little piece that overshadowed all his other compositions ~ arranged for string quartet by Eugene Gruenberg, head of the violin department at the New England Conservatory of Music at the turn of the last century and a close friend of the celebrated conductor Arthur Nikisch

Ignacy Feliks DOBRZYNSKI  Andante e Rondo alla Polacca Op. 42 • circa 1827
  • a wistful Andante and stately polonaise for flute and piano, originally flute and orchestra, by Józef Elsner’s pupil and Chopin’s classmate at the Warsaw Conservatory ~ except for a two-year period spent in Berlin and Europe, Dobrzynski was active in Warsaw’s musical life—composing, performing as a pianist, teaching, and conducting operas and symphony concerts he organized ~ the piano part is transcribed by Stefan KISIELEWSKI (1911-1991), the Polish composer and politician

Frédéric CHOPIN  Grande Polonaise Brillante Op. 22 • 1830-1834
  • exceptional display of bravado and brilliance ~ used in the 2002 movie The Pianist with Adrien Brody ~ in an arrangement by Bartlomiej KOMINEK for piano and string quartet, originally orchestra, based on the score of the Polonaise edited by Kazimierz Sikorski in the Complete Works, the series initiated by Paderewski

Juliusz ZAREBSKI  Piano Quintet in G minor Op. 34 • 1885
  • Romanticism on a grand scale ~ it’s passionate, powerful and glorious, even while recalling Brahms, Franck and Liszt—his teacher, friend and dedicatee of this cyclical masterpiece ~ his last work before succumbing to tuberculosis at age 31, it was rediscovered by Martha Argerich, who performed it at the Lugano Festival in 2011 ~ his name is pronounced Yoo-liush Za-remp-ski

March 17  Best Foot Forward

Seymour Lipkin piano
Maria Bachmann
violin
Lisa Shihoten violin
Vadim Lando
basset horn

Cynthia Phelps viola
Dov Scheindlin viola
David Requiro cello
Meta Weiss cello

Johann Georg Heinrich BACKOFEN  Quintet for Basset Horn in F Major Op. 9 • date not known
  • the influential harpist and clarinetist’s lively exploration of the capabilities of the basset horn as a virtuoso instrument ~ famous in his day, Backofen (1768-1830) performed in Spain, France and Italy before moving to Darmstadt to work at the court ~ he was also an instrument maker and teacher; his harp pupil, Dorette Scheidler, was married to Louis Spohr

Seldom heard at Jupiter, the basset horn is blessed with an exceptionally reedy and rich tone, mellow and sensuous. Mozart is foremost in his appreciation of this beautiful instrument, using it in his Requiem, the operas La Clemenza di Tito and Zauberflöte, and in chamber music.

SCHUBERT  Fantasie in F minor D. 940 • 1828
  • among the musical wonders of the world, composed the year of his death at age 31 and dedicated to Karoline Esterházy, the object of his unrequited love ~ arranged by the Austrian violist Firmian LERMER for string sextet from the original for piano-4 hands

BEETHOVEN  Piano Trio in C minor Op. 1 No. 3 • 1795
  • big, bold and spirited ~ written in Vienna, where he stayed at the house of Prince Karl Lichnowsky, the dedicatee who financed its engraving ~ although Beethoven considered it the best of the three Opus 1 trios, Haydn discouraged its publication, believing that it would not be easily understood and favorably received by the public, thereby astonishing Beethoven and leading him “to think that Haydn was envious, jealous and ill-disposed toward him” (so stated Ferdinand Ries) ~ in a version for piano, violin and viola, the viola part transcribed from the cello by the 19th century musicologist and critic Wilhelm ALTMANN

March 31  Dazzlers

Stephen Beus piano
Frank Morelli bassoon
Barry Crawford flute
Rita Mitsel oboe
Vadim Lando
clarinet

Josef Spacek violin
Lisa Shihoten violin

Maurycy Banaszek viola
David Requiro cello
Samuel Casseday double bass

Franz Anton HOFFMEISTER  Double Bass Quartet No. 3 in D Major • date not known
  • pizzazz for the double bass, by the prominent publisher and friend of Mozart, Haydn and Beethoven, who addressed him in a letter as “most beloved brother” ~ his passion, however, was composing and he was madly prolific, writing 66 symphonies and 100 flute quartets as well as double bass quartets, among numerous other pieces that were popular in his day

Joseph LAUBER  Quatre Intermezzi • 1922
  • buckle up with 4 winds on Swiss Air ~ born in Ruswil, the Swiss composer’s music is rooted in German late Romanticism, but also influenced by French Impressionism, especially Debussy and Fauré ~ for flute, cor anglais, horn and bassoon

Edouard DUPUY  Quintet in A minor • date not known
  • Classical wizardry by the Swiss-born violinist, singer and composer, who led quite a colorful and peripatetic life—by 1785 he was leader at the private theater of Prince Henry of Prussia, but a scandal led to his dismissal in 1792 for riding a horse into a Sunday church service in the spirit of Voltaire, so he became a touring violinist. By 1793 he was in Stockholm, working actively as a singer and composer in the court orchestra. He was then expelled from Sweden in 1799 for political reasons and moved to Copenhagen where, in 1807, he sang the title role in Mozart’s Don Giovanni. His stay in Denmark, however, was cut short when Princess Charlotte Frederikke of Mecklenburg, whose singing teacher he was, fell in love with him, and their alleged affair led to their exile in 1809. Dupuy then went to Paris, but in 1811, a change in the Swedish political situation enabled him to return to Stockholm ~ the virtuosic quintet for bassoon and string quartet was probably written while he was a court composer in Stockholm

Hermann GOETZ  Piano Quintet in C minor Op. 16 • 1874
  • the manuscript of this gorgeous Romantic work bears an anguished quote of suffering from Goethe, in awareness of the German composer’s rapidly deteriorating health from tuberculosis ~ he died four days before his 36th birthday in 1876 ~ his great admirers included the conductor Felix Weingartner and George Bernard Shaw ~ for piano, violin, viola, cello and double bass

 
 
 
April
April 7  Jolly Good

Xiao-Dong Wang violin
Cynthia Phelps viola
Lisa Shihoten violin
David Requiro cello
Samuel Casseday double bass

Roman Rabinovich piano
Jessica Muirhead soprano
Barry Crawford flute
Vadim Lando clarinet

Sir John Kenneth TAVENER  Akhmatova Songs • 1993
  • austere, intense and dramatic, the 5 Songs for soprano and string quartet express a range of emotions, from the increasingly declamatory “Pushkin and Lermontov” to the childlike innocence of “Boris Pasternak” ~ based on poems of the great Russian poet, Anna Akhmatova, Tavener explained that he liked them because of “their simplicity, their starkness, their lack of frills, their complete lack of complexity”

Dmitri SHOSTAKOVICH  4 Waltzes
  • ‘twill get you twirling 1-2-3 • 1-2-3 • 1-2-3 • 1-2-3 ~ or, “um chuk chuk,” as Jens Nygaard would say—it’s Lawrence Welk; and in this case, it’s also Shostakovich’s take on the waltz as arranged from various pieces by his friend, Lev Atovmyan, for flute/piccolo, clarinet and piano ~ Shostakovich was also close friends with Britten, the dedicatee of his 15th Symphony; and he and Akhmatova were admirers of one another

Benjamin BRITTEN  Simple Symphony Op. 4 • 1934
  • originally for string orchestra, Britten’s sunny and captivating masterwork drew on themes from his childhood compositions—songs and piano pieces written between the ages of nine and twelve ~ the movement titles reflect on the character of this not so simple work completed at age 20—“Boisterous Bourrée,” “Playful Pizzicato,” “Sentimental Saraband,” and “Frolicsome Finale” ~ in his version for string quartet

Ralph VAUGHAN WILLIAMS  Quintet in C minor • 1903; revised 1905
  • both Brahms and English folk music influence this expansive late Romantic quintet—its passionate first movement is followed by an expressive Andante that resembles his song “Silent Noon” (composed the same year), and concludes with a rhapsodic theme and variations Finale, contrasting in tempo, mood and tonality ~ for piano, violin, viola, cello and double bass

April 21  Loved by Cognoscenti
Adam Neiman piano
Stefan Milenkovich
violin
Lisa Shihoten violin
Milena Pajaro-van de Stadt
viola
Andrew Janss cello
Frank Morelli
bassoon
Vadim Lando clarinet
Karl Kramer
horn

Henryk WIENIAWSKI  Polonaise de concert Op. 4 and Légende Op. 17 • 1852 and circa 1860
  • showpieces for violin and piano to display the young Polish composer’s verve, heroic spirit and virtuosity ~ Légende also helped to secure his engagement to Isabella Hampton, whose parents had disapproved of Henryk until they were floored by the piece

Adolphe BLANC  Septet in E Major Op. 40 • 1860
  • awarded the 1862 Chartier chamber music prize by the Académie des beaux-arts, the lively Septet bubbles with an inexhaustible flow of beautiful melodies and the liveliest scherzo imaginable—in Blanc’s refined, elegant style in the Romantic Viennese tradition of hausmusik, that is, for private performance ~ for violin, viola, cello, double bass, clarinet, horn and bassoon

Frédéric CHOPIN  Piano Concerto No. 2 in F minor Op. 21 • 1830
  • poetry, beauty and imagination to move the soul ~ completed at age 20, before he left Poland to tour Europe, finally settling in Paris, never to return to his homeland ~ he played the solo at its premiere in Warsaw on March 17 and was proclaimed a national hero; a year later, on 26 February 1832, he made his first appearance in Paris, again performing this concerto, garnering praise from Liszt and Mendelssohn ~ for piano, string quartet and double bass as arranged by Paul WALDERSEE, published in 1836

 
 
 
May
May 5  Treasure Chest
William Wolfram piano
Augustin Hadelich violin
Lisa Shihoten violin
Mark Holloway
viola
Austin Huntington cello
Vadim Lando
clarinet
Gina Cuffari
bassoon
 
Note: Drew Petersen
replaces William Wolfram for this concert

Georg Abraham SCHNEIDER  Bassoon Quartet Op. 43 • 1808
  • full of wit, enthusiasm and vitality expressed through skilled instrumental writing ~ a contemporary of Beethoven, Schneider was a significant figure in early 19th-century music in Berlin—in addition to composing, he was a horn virtuoso and also played the oboe and violin in court orchestras in Darmstadt, Rheinsberg and Berlin; a concert promoter as well, he founded a series of subscription concerts in 1807; and he was conductor at Kotzebue’s theater in Reval (now Tallinn) and music director of the Königliche Schauspiele, then was appointed Royal Prussian Kapellmeister in 1825

BEETHOVEN  Quartet in Eb Major Op. 71 • 1796
  • its first performance garnered a glowing review from the Allgemeine musikalische Zeitung, Europe’s music journal of record during Beethoven’s lifetime, as “a composition that shines resplendent by reason of its lively melodies, unconstrained harmonies, and a wealth of new and surprising ideas” ~ Beethoven claimed to have written it in a single night (maybe, maybe not, as the sketches suggest a longer period) ~ transcribed for clarinet quartet from the Wind Sextet by the Israeli musician Mordechai RECHTMAN

Theodor KIRCHNER  Canonic Pieces Op. 56 • 1888
  • loosely based on Schumann’s Six Pieces in Canon Form for pedal piano, Kirchner’s charming character pieces for piano trio are of unfailing beauty and memorable melodies, expert counterpoint and lucid form ~ a pupil of Mendelssohn and friend of the Schumanns and Brahms, Kirchner was universally admired as a marvelous musician, but he could not maintain a job or marriage, and his gambling and extravagance led to destitution in his later years, so much so that his publisher and friends, including Brahms, bailed him out of debt

Antonín DVORÁK  Piano Trio No. 4 in E minor “Dumky” Op. 90 • 1891
  • Slavic melancholy and a contradictory delirious joy of life permeate this audience favorite ~ it’s the Idol of Prague at his folksiest and most original

 May 19  Très Belle Finale

André Laplante piano
Anton Barakhovsky
violin
Lisa Shihoten violin
Stefani Collins violin
Milena Pajaro-van de Stadt viola

Ani Aznavoorian cello
Barry Crawford flute
Vadim Lando clarinet
Karl Kramer horn
Gina Cuffari bassoon

Ernest CHAUSSON  Chanson perpétuelle Op. 37 • 1898
  • set to the poem by Charles Cros of a betrayed woman who contemplates suicide by drowning, this haunting, restless song for soprano, piano and string quartet is a miniature masterpiece ~ his last work before his life was cut short at age 44 by a freak bicycle accident

Anton REICHA  Octet in Eb Major Op. 96 • [1817]
  • a sparkling, imaginative and creative Classical work on a symphonic scale by the Czech-born French composer, who was a lifelong friend of Beethoven and Haydn, and influential teacher of Berlioz, Gounod, Liszt and Franck in counterpoint and fugue ~ Alan Becker of the South Florida Classical Review noted that Reicha’s “music adheres mostly to the doctrines of Viennese classicism.... The melodic fecundity and folk-like themes he used with great skill give this music a lift and buoyancy that are hard to resist. Themes are tossed from one instrument to another, virtuosity is required for each player, and the rich palette of instrumental colors is fully exploited with nary a touch of Beethoven’s influence to be found” ~ for 2 violins, viola, cello, flute, clarinet, horn and bassoon

César FRANCK  Piano Quintet Op. 44 • 1878
  • Harold Schonberg described the pièce de resistance as “beautifully written and very striking,” but Camille Saint-Saëns, the pianist for the Quintet’s première in 1880, “hated every bit of it and stalked off the stage, refusing to return for the applause. He even left the manuscript on the piano, although it was dedicated to him, but one of Franck’s pupils rescued it.”

 
 
 

*All programs are subject to change.

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Last updated 03/26/14